Archive for the 'Stock Market' Category

Intel- International job losses

Computer giant Intel , who have reported a loss in sales of personal computers this year,  announce their restructuring of employment . They plan on reducing jobs by over 12,000. It employs over 5,200 people in Ireland but job losses across Europe have not been specified yet.

Will corporation tax play its part in keeping Intel in Ireland?

Are the skill’s and expertise of our workforce an incentive to save the Irish jobs?

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TY Stock Market Module 4 Winners!

IMAG0564Anthony O’Boyle, Conor Gillardy, Aleksander Pawlak and Cathal Abberton.

TY Stock Competition Winners

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TY Stock Market Competition winners: John Maughan, David McNicholas, Eimhin Morrin and Evan Heneghan.

 

Microsoft announce new CEO

Microsoft has named 22-year company veteran Satya Nadella as its next chief executive officer, while also announcing that co-founder Bill Gates would step down as chairman and advise the new CEO on technology.

The moves mark an epochal change of control at the company that drove the PC revolution.

Mr Nadella, a 46-year old born in India who led the creation of Microsoft’s cloud computing services, is only Microsoft’s third CEO in 39 years, taking over from Steve Ballmer, who inherited the job from Mr Gates in 2000.

The move ends a five-month search process at the Redmond, Washington-based company, triggered by the August announcement of Mr Ballmer’s decision to retire.

Source: rte.ie

TY Stock Market Competition Winners

Well done to everyone in Mr. Naughton’s 4A1 Stock Market class for participating in the online Stock Competition.

1st place: Cillian Melly

2nd place: Adrian Rowland

3rd place: Cian Ruane

Stock Market Exam – Mr. Naughton

Click on the link below to take the exam for The Stock Market module.

Stock Market Exam – Module 1

4A1 Stock Competition Leaderboard

4A5 Stock Market Exam – Module 2

Please take your online exam for The Stock Market module. This exam is for the 4A5 class for Module 2.

Your mark is based on your first attempt. The exam is 80% of the total marks. 20% is for your work in class during the module.

You will receive your mark at the end of the exam. Do print your Certificate as well.

Click here to do the test.

School Stock Competiton – Join Now!

You can enter the St. Gerald’s Stock Competition from today (December 19th).

The competition ends on March 16th 2012 and the winner will receive a €50 voucher.

Thanks to Robert Comer in TY for setting up the competition on MarketWatch.com

Follow these instructions to join the game:

2. Click on Login
3. Register an account with the website. Use your school email address …@geralds.ie
4. Once you have registered with the MarketWatch website, log into it. Go to Find a Game.
5. Search for the game called “St Geralds Stock Competition”.
6. Join the game. The password is stgeralds

Please note: If you used the Marketwatch.com website before (e.g., played in a previous school competition), login using the same user account as before.

Best of luck and follow all the updates on our Facebook page!

What are bonds?

There has been a lot in the news recently about “bonds” and “bond yields”.

The following is an article from the Sunday Business Post that explains what these are.

What is a bond?

A bond is a unit of debt. The bonds we’re all talking about these days are sovereign bonds, or units of government debt. But companies sell them too.

It’s just a contract by which an investor agrees to loan money to a company or government in exchange for a predetermined interest rate and generally for a predetermined period of time (two years, five years, ten years).

Why is it bad when bonds rise?

When we say a bond has risen, we mean the yield – or interest rate – on that bond has risen. Effectively yields and prices move in the opposite direction. A rising bond yield is a falling bond price.

As yields rise, it indicates investors won’t buy that country’s debt unless they get a better return. The higher the level of risk they perceive to their investment , the higher the interest rate which investors demand.

Right now investors fear that if they lend to Italy they may eventually not get all their money back – so they are demanding a higher interest rate to compensate for this perceived risk.

Right. And seven per cent is a high yield is it?

Yes it’s very high, particularly when a German bond is yielding two per cent, which means investors want a five per cent premium from Italy (this is an enormous gap in sovereign debt terms).When yields in Ireland and Portugal hit that level, it was time for a bailout.

OK, so why doesn’t Italy just stop selling bonds for a while until it all blows over?

It might have to, but then it has to worry about how to pay its bills. It needs to repay some maturing bonds later this year and has to raise a hefty €300 billion in 2012.The EU/IMF could offer funds to Italy – but they probably do not have enough in the kitty to bail Italy out for a period of years, as they have done with Ireland, Greece and Portugal.

The full article is available here.


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